Question 1(Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)[MC]Read these lines from Fredrick Douglass’s speech “What to The Slave Is the Fourth of…

Question 1 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.l.1112.1b>

Read these lines from Fredrick Douglass’s speech “What to The Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

I hear the mournful wail of millions, whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are to-day rendered more intolerable by the jubilant shouts that reach them.

Which definition of rendered is most likely suited for this line?

 Caused to be a certain nature Melted down Repeated or recited Submitted for approvalQuestion 2 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.rl.1112.3>

Fall of the House of Usher, excerpt

By Edgar Allan Poe

Upon my entrance, Usher rose from a sofa on which he had been lying at full length, and greeted me with a vivacious warmth which had much in it, I at first thought, of an overdone cordiality—of the constrained effort of the ennuyé1 man of the world. A glance, however, at his countenance convinced me of his perfect sincerity. We sat down; and for some moments, while he spoke not, I gazed upon him with a feeling half of pity, half of awe. Surely, man had never before so terribly altered, in so brief a period, as had Roderick Usher! It was with difficulty that I could bring myself to admit the identity of the wan being before me with the companion of my early boyhood. Yet the character of his face had been at all times remarkable. A cadaverousness of complexion; an eye large, liquid, and luminous beyond comparison; lips somewhat thin and very pallid, but of a surpassingly beautiful curve; a nose of a delicate Hebrew model, but with a breadth of nostril unusual in similar formations; a finely moulded chin, speaking, in its want of prominence, of a want of moral energy; hair of a more than web-like softness and tenuity;—these features, with an inordinate expansion above the regions of the temple, made up altogether a countenance not easily to be forgotten. And now in the mere exaggeration of the prevailing character of these features, and of the expression they were wont to convey, lay so much of change that I doubted to whom I spoke. The now ghastly pallor of the skin, and the now miraculous lustre of the eye, above all things startled and even awed me. The silken hair, too, had been suffered to grow all unheeded, and as, in its wild gossamer texture, it floated rather than fell about the face, I could not, even with effort, connect its Arabesque expression with any idea of simple humanity.

In the manner of my friend I was at once struck with an incoherence—an inconsistency; and I soon found this to arise from a series of feeble and futile struggles to overcome an habitual trepidancy—an excessive nervous agitation. For something of this nature I had indeed been prepared, no less by his letter, than by reminiscences of certain boyish traits, and by conclusions deduced from his peculiar physical conformation and temperament. His action was alternately vivacious and sullen. His voice varied rapidly from a tremulous indecision to that species of energetic concision—that abrupt, weighty, unhurried, and hollow-sounding enunciation—that leaden, self-balanced and perfectly modulated guttural utterance.

1Bored

Which of the following descriptions does Poe use to directly illustrate the “incoherence” and “inconsistency” of Usher?

 suffered to grow all unheeded His voice varied rapidly ghastly pallor of the skin A cadaverousness of complexionQuestion 3 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.l.1112.1a>

Read these lines from Fredrick Douglass’s speech “What to The Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

But I fancy I hear some one of my audience say, it is just in this circumstance that you and your brother abolitionists fail to make a favorable impression on the public mind.

Which word is most similar to how fancy is used here?

 Accept Believe Desire InsistQuestion 4 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.l.1112.1a>

Read these lines from Fredrick Douglass’s speech “What to The Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

The blessings in which you this day rejoice, are not enjoyed in common.

Which of the following correctly defines the word common as it is used here?

 Of ordinary occurrence; usual Of the most familiar type Falling below ordinary standards Shared alike by all the persons in questionQuestion 5 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.rl.1112.3>

Fall of the House of Usher, excerpt

By Edgar Allan Poe

The room in which I found myself was very large and lofty. The windows were long, narrow, and pointed, and at so vast a distance from the black oaken floor as to be altogether inaccessible from within. Feeble gleams of encrimsoned light made their way through the trellised panes, and served to render sufficiently distinct the more prominent objects around; the eye, however, struggled in vain to reach the remoter angles of the chamber, or the recesses of the vaulted and fretted ceiling. Dark draperies hung upon the walls. The general furniture was profuse, comfortless, antique, and tattered. Many books and musical instruments lay scattered about, but failed to give any vitality to the scene. I felt that I breathed an atmosphere of sorrow. An air of stern, deep, and irredeemable gloom hung over and pervaded all.

Which words from this paragraph help create an unsettling mood?

 trellised panes sorrow, failed instruments, atmosphere oaken floorQuestion 6 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.ri.1112.9>

WHAT TO THE SLAVE IS THE FOURTH OF JULY?

By Frederick Douglass

Extract from an Oration, at Rochester, July 5, 1852

Fellow-Citizens—Pardon me, and allow me to ask, why am I called upon to speak here to-day? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? and am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national altar, and to confess the benefits, and express devout gratitude for the blessings, resulting from your independence to us?

But, such is not the state of the case. I say it with a sad sense of the disparity between us. I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you this day rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity, and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters into the grand illuminated temple of liberty, and call upon him to join you in joyous anthems, were inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony. Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day? . . .

Fellow-citizens, above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions, whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are to-day rendered more intolerable by the jubilant shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not faithfully remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, “may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!” To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs, and to chime in with the popular theme, would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, then, fellow-citizens, is AMERICAN SLAVERY. I shall see this day and its popular characteristics from the slave’s point of view. Standing there, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July. Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the professions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting.

Which of the following correctly explains the main purpose of Douglass’s speech?

 To argue that Americans have little to celebrate To suggest an alternative form of celebration To imply it is time to develop new American traditions To explain the effects of slavery on cultureQuestion 7 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.w.1112.2c>

Read these two sentences:

  • The number of nursing students has nearly doubled this year.
  • The majority of the new students are male.

Which transition word correctly links the two sentences?

 Additionally Consequently However ThusQuestion 8 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.l.1112.2a>

Which pair correctly uses a hyphen?

 Big-furry dog Happy-little girl Friendly-looking dog Large-green sofaQuestion 9 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.rl.1112.1>

Fall of the House of Usher, excerpt

By Edgar Allan Poe

Upon my entrance, Usher rose from a sofa on which he had been lying at full length, and greeted me with a vivacious warmth which had much in it, I at first thought, of an overdone cordiality—of the constrained effort of the ennuyé1 man of the world. A glance, however, at his countenance convinced me of his perfect sincerity. We sat down; and for some moments, while he spoke not, I gazed upon him with a feeling half of pity, half of awe. Surely, man had never before so terribly altered, in so brief a period, as had Roderick Usher! It was with difficulty that I could bring myself to admit the identity of the wan being before me with the companion of my early boyhood. Yet the character of his face had been at all times remarkable. A cadaverousness of complexion; an eye large, liquid, and luminous beyond comparison; lips somewhat thin and very pallid, but of a surpassingly beautiful curve; a nose of a delicate Hebrew model, but with a breadth of nostril unusual in similar formations; a finely moulded chin, speaking, in its want of prominence, of a want of moral energy; hair of a more than web-like softness and tenuity;—these features, with an inordinate expansion above the regions of the temple, made up altogether a countenance not easily to be forgotten. And now in the mere exaggeration of the prevailing character of these features, and of the expression they were wont to convey, lay so much of change that I doubted to whom I spoke. The now ghastly pallor of the skin, and the now miraculous lustre of the eye, above all things startled and even awed me. The silken hair, too, had been suffered to grow all unheeded, and as, in its wild gossamer texture, it floated rather than fell about the face, I could not, even with effort, connect its Arabesque expression with any idea of simple humanity.

In the manner of my friend I was at once struck with an incoherence—an inconsistency; and I soon found this to arise from a series of feeble and futile struggles to overcome an habitual trepidancy—an excessive nervous agitation. For something of this nature I had indeed been prepared, no less by his letter, than by reminiscences of certain boyish traits, and by conclusions deduced from his peculiar physical conformation and temperament. His action was alternately vivacious and sullen. His voice varied rapidly from a tremulous indecision to that species of energetic concision—that abrupt, weighty, unhurried, and hollow-sounding enunciation—that leaden, self-balanced and perfectly modulated guttural utterance.

1Bored

Which words from the text best describe Usher’s appearance?

 struck with an incoherence alternately vivacious and sullen a want of moral energy Ghastly pallor of the skinQuestion 10 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[HC]<object:standard:lacc.ri.1112.8>

WHAT TO THE SLAVE IS THE FOURTH OF JULY?

By Frederick Douglass

Extract from an Oration, at Rochester, July 5, 1852

Fellow-Citizens—Pardon me, and allow me to ask, why am I called upon to speak here to-day? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? and am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national altar, and to confess the benefits, and express devout gratitude for the blessings, resulting from your independence to us?

But, such is not the state of the case. I say it with a sad sense of the disparity between us. I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you this day rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity, and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters into the grand illuminated temple of liberty, and call upon him to join you in joyous anthems, were inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony. Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day? . . .

Fellow-citizens, above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions, whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are to-day rendered more intolerable by the jubilant shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not faithfully remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, “may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!” To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs, and to chime in with the popular theme, would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, then, fellow-citizens, is AMERICAN SLAVERY. I shall see this day and its popular characteristics from the slave’s point of view. Standing there, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July. Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the professions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting.

Read this line from “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

Standing there, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July.

What is Douglass implying in this text?

 His presence at the celebration shows that he has forgotten the past. By speaking at the celebration, he feels complicit with the atrocities of the nation. Witnessing the celebration has shown him that the nation is even crueler than he thought. His speech will cause the audience to re-evaluate the meaning of freedom.Question 11 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.w.1112.9b>

WHAT TO THE SLAVE IS THE FOURTH OF JULY?

By Frederick Douglass

Extract from an Oration, at Rochester, July 5, 1852

Fellow-Citizens—Pardon me, and allow me to ask, why am I called upon to speak here to-day? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? and am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national altar, and to confess the benefits, and express devout gratitude for the blessings, resulting from your independence to us?

But, such is not the state of the case. I say it with a sad sense of the disparity between us. I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you this day rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity, and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters into the grand illuminated temple of liberty, and call upon him to join you in joyous anthems, were inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony. Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day? . . .

Fellow-citizens, above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions, whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are to-day rendered more intolerable by the jubilant shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not faithfully remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, “may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!” To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs, and to chime in with the popular theme, would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, then, fellow-citizens, is AMERICAN SLAVERY. I shall see this day and its popular characteristics from the slave’s point of view. Standing there, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July. Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the professions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting.

What does Douglass say is on his mind during the celebrations?

 War Money Slavery PoliticsQuestion 12 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.w.1112.9b>

WHAT TO THE SLAVE IS THE FOURTH OF JULY?

By Frederick Douglass

Extract from an Oration, at Rochester, July 5, 1852

Fellow-Citizens—Pardon me, and allow me to ask, why am I called upon to speak here to-day? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? and am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national altar, and to confess the benefits, and express devout gratitude for the blessings, resulting from your independence to us?

But, such is not the state of the case. I say it with a sad sense of the disparity between us. I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you this day rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity, and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters into the grand illuminated temple of liberty, and call upon him to join you in joyous anthems, were inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony. Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day? . . .

Fellow-citizens, above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions, whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are to-day rendered more intolerable by the jubilant shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not faithfully remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, “may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!” To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs, and to chime in with the popular theme, would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, then, fellow-citizens, is AMERICAN SLAVERY. I shall see this day and its popular characteristics from the slave’s point of view. Standing there, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July. Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the professions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting.

What is the main message of Douglass’s speech?

 The fight for independence was a long, hard battle. The fact of slavery ruins the celebrations of the Fourth of July. The people who came to America were surprised by its history. The story of most nations is difficult to catalogue.Question 13 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.rl.1112.2>

Fall of the House of Usher, excerpt

By Edgar Allan Poe

Upon my entrance, Usher rose from a sofa on which he had been lying at full length, and greeted me with a vivacious warmth which had much in it, I at first thought, of an overdone cordiality—of the constrained effort of the ennuyé1 man of the world. A glance, however, at his countenance convinced me of his perfect sincerity. We sat down; and for some moments, while he spoke not, I gazed upon him with a feeling half of pity, half of awe. Surely, man had never before so terribly altered, in so brief a period, as had Roderick Usher! It was with difficulty that I could bring myself to admit the identity of the wan being before me with the companion of my early boyhood. Yet the character of his face had been at all times remarkable. A cadaverousness of complexion; an eye large, liquid, and luminous beyond comparison; lips somewhat thin and very pallid, but of a surpassingly beautiful curve; a nose of a delicate Hebrew model, but with a breadth of nostril unusual in similar formations; a finely moulded chin, speaking, in its want of prominence, of a want of moral energy; hair of a more than web-like softness and tenuity;—these features, with an inordinate expansion above the regions of the temple, made up altogether a countenance not easily to be forgotten. And now in the mere exaggeration of the prevailing character of these features, and of the expression they were wont to convey, lay so much of change that I doubted to whom I spoke. The now ghastly pallor of the skin, and the now miraculous lustre of the eye, above all things startled and even awed me. The silken hair, too, had been suffered to grow all unheeded, and as, in its wild gossamer texture, it floated rather than fell about the face, I could not, even with effort, connect its Arabesque expression with any idea of simple humanity.

1Bored

Which sentence summarizes the meaning of this passage?

 The narrator is surprised and concerned. The narrator has never felt happier. The narrator is afraid of death. The narrator has found his true purpose.Question 14 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.rl.1112.2>

Fall of the House of Usher, excerpt

By Edgar Allan Poe

Upon my entrance, Usher rose from a sofa on which he had been lying at full length, and greeted me with a vivacious warmth which had much in it, I at first thought, of an overdone cordiality—of the constrained effort of the ennuyé1 man of the world. A glance, however, at his countenance convinced me of his perfect sincerity. We sat down; and for some moments, while he spoke not, I gazed upon him with a feeling half of pity, half of awe. Surely, man had never before so terribly altered, in so brief a period, as had Roderick Usher! It was with difficulty that I could bring myself to admit the identity of the wan being before me with the companion of my early boyhood. Yet the character of his face had been at all times remarkable. A cadaverousness of complexion; an eye large, liquid, and luminous beyond comparison; lips somewhat thin and very pallid, but of a surpassingly beautiful curve; a nose of a delicate Hebrew model, but with a breadth of nostril unusual in similar formations; a finely moulded chin, speaking, in its want of prominence, of a want of moral energy; hair of a more than web-like softness and tenuity;—these features, with an inordinate expansion above the regions of the temple, made up altogether a countenance not easily to be forgotten. And now in the mere exaggeration of the prevailing character of these features, and of the expression they were wont to convey, lay so much of change that I doubted to whom I spoke. The now ghastly pallor of the skin, and the now miraculous lustre of the eye, above all things startled and even awed me. The silken hair, too, had been suffered to grow all unheeded, and as, in its wild gossamer texture, it floated rather than fell about the face, I could not, even with effort, connect its Arabesque expression with any idea of simple humanity.

In the manner of my friend I was at once struck with an incoherence—an inconsistency; and I soon found this to arise from a series of feeble and futile struggles to overcome an habitual trepidancy—an excessive nervous agitation. For something of this nature I had indeed been prepared, no less by his letter, than by reminiscences of certain boyish traits, and by conclusions deduced from his peculiar physical conformation and temperament. His action was alternately vivacious and sullen. His voice varied rapidly from a tremulous indecision to that species of energetic concision—that abrupt, weighty, unhurried, and hollow-sounding enunciation—that leaden, self-balanced and perfectly modulated guttural utterance.

1Bored

In this excerpt, the narrator notes that Usher is “alternately vivacious and sullen.” Which pair of phrases from the passage most clearly illustrates this contrast between being “vivacious” and being “sullen” in Usher’s behavior?

 Animated/brooding Balanced/impulsive Concerned/exclusive Complicated/menacingQuestion 15 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.rl.1112.4>

Fall of the House of Usher, excerpt

By Edgar Allan Poe

Upon my entrance, Usher rose from a sofa on which he had been lying at full length, and greeted me with a vivacious warmth which had much in it, I at first thought, of an overdone cordiality—of the constrained effort of the ennuyé1 man of the world. A glance, however, at his countenance convinced me of his perfect sincerity. We sat down; and for some moments, while he spoke not, I gazed upon him with a feeling half of pity, half of awe. Surely, man had never before so terribly altered, in so brief a period, as had Roderick Usher! It was with difficulty that I could bring myself to admit the identity of the wan being before me with the companion of my early boyhood. Yet the character of his face had been at all times remarkable. A cadaverousness of complexion; an eye large, liquid, and luminous beyond comparison; lips somewhat thin and very pallid, but of a surpassingly beautiful curve; a nose of a delicate Hebrew model, but with a breadth of nostril unusual in similar formations; a finely moulded chin, speaking, in its want of prominence, of a want of moral energy; hair of a more than web-like softness and tenuity;—these features, with an inordinate expansion above the regions of the temple, made up altogether a countenance not easily to be forgotten. And now in the mere exaggeration of the prevailing character of these features, and of the expression they were wont to convey, lay so much of change that I doubted to whom I spoke. The now ghastly pallor of the skin, and the now miraculous lustre of the eye, above all things startled and even awed me. The silken hair, too, had been suffered to grow all unheeded, and as, in its wild gossamer texture, it floated rather than fell about the face, I could not, even with effort, connect its Arabesque expression with any idea of simple humanity.

In the manner of my friend I was at once struck with an incoherence—an inconsistency; and I soon found this to arise from a series of feeble and futile struggles to overcome an habitual trepidancy—an excessive nervous agitation. For something of this nature I had indeed been prepared, no less by his letter, than by reminiscences of certain boyish traits, and by conclusions deduced from his peculiar physical conformation and temperament. His action was alternately vivacious and sullen. His voice varied rapidly from a tremulous indecision to that species of energetic concision—that abrupt, weighty, unhurried, and hollow-sounding enunciation—that leaden, self-balanced and perfectly modulated guttural utterance.

1Bored

Read this line from the text:

His action was alternately vivacious and sullen.

Pay close attention to the words in this sentence. What meaning is the author trying to convey?

 Usher was always unhappy. Usher was always happy. Usher seemed sometimes happy and sometimes sad. Usher hid his emotions and looked still.Question 16 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.w.1112.2d>

Read the sentence and answer the following question:

Our assignment this week directs us to learn about chemical compounds and their properties.

Which words should be replaced with something more precise?

 Learn about Chemical compounds Directs us Their propertiesQuestion 17 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.w.1112.2d>

Read the sentence and answer the following question:

I have read a bunch of informative texts on the topic you just mentioned, and I would be glad to add my insights to our conversation.

Which words should be replaced with something more precise? 

 Informative Bunch Topic InsightsQuestion 18 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.ri.1112.8>

WHAT TO THE SLAVE IS THE FOURTH OF JULY?

By Frederick Douglass

Extract from an Oration, at Rochester, July 5, 1852

Fellow-Citizens—Pardon me, and allow me to ask, why am I called upon to speak here to-day? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? and am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national altar, and to confess the benefits, and express devout gratitude for the blessings, resulting from your independence to us?

But, such is not the state of the case. I say it with a sad sense of the disparity between us. I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you this day rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity, and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters into the grand illuminated temple of liberty, and call upon him to join you in joyous anthems, were inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony. Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day? . . .

Fellow-citizens, above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions, whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are to-day rendered more intolerable by the jubilant shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not faithfully remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, “may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!” To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs, and to chime in with the popular theme, would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, then, fellow-citizens, is AMERICAN SLAVERY. I shall see this day and its popular characteristics from the slave’s point of view. Standing there, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July. Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the professions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting.

br>

What does Douglass hold the nation accountable for?

 Changing the Declaration of Independence Remembering the suffering of others in the midst of their joy The need to stop celebrating the Fourth of July The hideous and revolting conduct of the past and presentQuestion 19 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.ri.1112.9>

WHAT TO THE SLAVE IS THE FOURTH OF JULY?

By Frederick Douglass

Extract from an Oration, at Rochester, July 5, 1852

Fellow-Citizens—Pardon me, and allow me to ask, why am I called upon to speak here to-day? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? and am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national altar, and to confess the benefits, and express devout gratitude for the blessings, resulting from your independence to us?

But, such is not the state of the case. I say it with a sad sense of the disparity between us. I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you this day rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity, and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters into the grand illuminated temple of liberty, and call upon him to join you in joyous anthems, were inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony. Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day? . . .

Fellow-citizens, above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions, whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are to-day rendered more intolerable by the jubilant shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not faithfully remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, “may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!” To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs, and to chime in with the popular theme, would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, then, fellow-citizens, is AMERICAN SLAVERY. I shall see this day and its popular characteristics from the slave’s point of view. Standing there, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July. Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the professions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting.

Read this line from the text:

I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us.

Why does Douglass say he is not included?

 He cannot relate to the sorrow the country feels for their misguided policies on slavery. He was told by someone in the crowd to leave. He feels disconnected from a nation that has endorsed slavery. He feels uncertain of his own nationality in such a melting pot of a country.Question 20 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.w.1112.2a>

Karin has found the following information during the research process for her informative paper:

  • A map of rainfall amounts in three neighboring states
  • A scientific description of the conditions that create droughts
  • A collection of stories from survivors of extreme droughts
  • A list of major water conservation efforts in the area

What is the most useful next step in the writing process for Karin?

 Conduct an interview of a local scientist. Develop the organizational plan for this information. Determine how these sources relate to each other. Write an introduction and conclusion for the paper.Question 21 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.w.1112.2b>

Which of the following would be most relevant to a research paper exploring the nutrition of school lunches?

 Interviews with a professional athlete List of options for foods that should be added to the menu to improve its quality Studies comparing a typical school meal to the recommended dietary allowances Testimony from a group of school cafeteria workersQuestion 22 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.l.1112.6>

Read this line from “The Fall of the House of Usher” by Edgar Allen Poe:

In the manner of my friend I was at once struck with an incoherence—an inconsistency; and I soon found this to arise from a series of feeble and futile struggles to overcome an habitualtrepidancy—an excessive nervous agitation.

Which word from this sentence does Poe present as a synonym for the word trepidancy?

 Manner Incoherence Inconsistency AgitationQuestion 23 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.rl.1112.5>

Fall of the House of Usher, excerpt

By Edgar Allan Poe

The room in which I found myself was very large and lofty. The windows were long, narrow, and pointed, and at so vast a distance from the black oaken floor as to be altogether inaccessible from within. Feeble gleams of encrimsoned light made their way through the trellised panes, and served to render sufficiently distinct the more prominent objects around; the eye, however, struggled in vain to reach the remoter angles of the chamber, or the recesses of the vaulted and fretted ceiling. Dark draperies hung upon the walls. The general furniture was profuse, comfortless, antique, and tattered. Many books and musical instruments lay scattered about, but failed to give any vitality to the scene. I felt that I breathed an atmosphere of sorrow. An air of stern, deep, and irredeemable gloom hung over and pervaded all.

Which of the following correctly describes the main purpose of the narrative in this paragraph?

 Creating setting Creating conflict Developing character Resolving conflictQuestion 24 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.w.1112.2f>

A student is concluding an essay about the benefits of fuel-efficient cars. Which of the following would best conclude that essay?

 Using oil as a fuel has negative consequences for the environment. More efficient cars are interesting to many people not learning to drive. We make change happen by taking an interest in the choices we have. Increasing fuel efficiency can help us both financially and ethically.Question 25 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.w.1112.8>

Which option presents citation information in the most credible way?

 According to Elana Martin, company spokesperson, “the error has not been traced to its ultimate source.” According to various sources, “the error has not been traced to its ultimate source.” “The error has not been traced to its ultimate source,” said the company spokesperson during Saturday’s interview. This error has not “been traced to its ultimate source,” according to a company spokesperson.Question 26 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.l.1112.2a>

Which sentence correctly uses a hyphen?

 The pecan-covered cake was super moist. The chocolate-cake was gone before the party ended. The dessert tray-offerings were many and mostly chocolate. The cupcakes were covered in delicious-chocolate shavings.Question 27 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.rl.1112.4>

Fall of the House of Usher, excerpt

By Edgar Allan Poe

Upon my entrance, Usher rose from a sofa on which he had been lying at full length, and greeted me with a vivacious warmth which had much in it, I at first thought, of an overdone cordiality—of the constrained effort of the ennuyé1 man of the world. A glance, however, at his countenance convinced me of his perfect sincerity. We sat down; and for some moments, while he spoke not, I gazed upon him with a feeling half of pity, half of awe. Surely, man had never before so terribly altered, in so brief a period, as had Roderick Usher! It was with difficulty that I could bring myself to admit the identity of the wan being before me with the companion of my early boyhood. Yet the character of his face had been at all times remarkable. A cadaverousness of complexion; an eye large, liquid, and luminous beyond comparison; lips somewhat thin and very pallid, but of a surpassingly beautiful curve; a nose of a delicate Hebrew model, but with a breadth of nostril unusual in similar formations; a finely moulded chin, speaking, in its want of prominence, of a want of moral energy; hair of a more than web-like softness and tenuity;—these features, with an inordinate expansion above the regions of the temple, made up altogether a countenance not easily to be forgotten. And now in the mere exaggeration of the prevailing character of these features, and of the expression they were wont to convey, lay so much of change that I doubted to whom I spoke. The now ghastly pallor of the skin, and the now miraculous lustre of the eye, above all things startled and even awed me. The silken hair, too, had been suffered to grow all unheeded, and as, in its wild gossamer texture, it floated rather than fell about the face, I could not, even with effort, connect its Arabesque expression with any idea of simple humanity.

1Bored

Read this line from the text:

hair of a more than web-like softness and tenuity

What is the meaning of this description of Usher’s hair?

 His hair is thin and creepy. His hair is made of spiderwebs. His hair is filled with bugs. His hair is coarse and healthy.Question 28 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.rl.1112.1>

Fall of the House of Usher, excerpt

By Edgar Allan Poe

The room in which I found myself was very large and lofty. The windows were long, narrow, and pointed, and at so vast a distance from the black oaken floor as to be altogether inaccessible from within. Feeble gleams of encrimsoned light made their way through the trellised panes, and served to render sufficiently distinct the more prominent objects around; the eye, however, struggled in vain to reach the remoter angles of the chamber, or the recesses of the vaulted and fretted ceiling. Dark draperies hung upon the walls. The general furniture was profuse, comfortless, antique, and tattered. Many books and musical instruments lay scattered about, but failed to give any vitality to the scene. I felt that I breathed an atmosphere of sorrow. An air of stern, deep, and irredeemable gloom hung over and pervaded all.

Which of the following statements is most likely true about the narrator?

 He feels glad to be where he is. He wants to move into this house. He feels sad looking at this room. He is angry with someone who lives here.Question 29 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[MC]<object:standard:lacc.l.1112.3a>

Which sentence below most strongly suggests the speaker is not responsible for the events?

 It was I who pulled the string that moved the chair that caused you to fall. You fell because I pulled the string which moved the chair. The chair moved and you fell because I pulled the string. The chair moved after the string I was holding was pulled.Question 30 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points)

[LC]<object:standard:lacc.w.1112.9a>

Fall of the House of Usher, excerpt

By Edgar Allan Poe

Upon my entrance, Usher rose from a sofa on which he had been lying at full length, and greeted me with a vivacious warmth which had much in it, I at first thought, of an overdone cordiality—of the constrained effort of the ennuyé1 man of the world. A glance, however, at his countenance convinced me of his perfect sincerity. We sat down; and for some moments, while he spoke not, I gazed upon him with a feeling half of pity, half of awe. Surely, man had never before so terribly altered, in so brief a period, as had Roderick Usher! It was with difficulty that I could bring myself to admit the identity of the wan being before me with the companion of my early boyhood. Yet the character of his face had been at all times remarkable. A cadaverousness of complexion; an eye large, liquid, and luminous beyond comparison; lips somewhat thin and very pallid, but of a surpassingly beautiful curve; a nose of a delicate Hebrew model, but with a breadth of nostril unusual in similar formations; a finely moulded chin, speaking, in its want of prominence, of a want of moral energy; hair of a more than web-like softness and tenuity;—these features, with an inordinate expansion above the regions of the temple, made up altogether a countenance not easily to be forgotten. And now in the mere exaggeration of the prevailing character of these features, and of the expression they were wont to convey, lay so much of change that I doubted to whom I spoke. The now ghastly pallor of the skin, and the now miraculous lustre of the eye, above all things startled and even awed me. The silken hair, too, had been suffered to grow all unheeded, and as, in its wild gossamer texture, it floated rather than fell about the face, I could not, even with effort, connect its Arabesque expression with any idea of simple humanity.

1Bored

What does the narrator believe about Roderick Usher’s greeting?

 At first he thinks it is sincere, but then he realizes it is not. At first he thinks it is meant to be offensive, but then he realizes it is not. At first he thinks it is polite, but then he realizes it is not. At first he thinks it is insincere, but then he realizes it is not.Question 31 (Essay Worth 20 points)

[Honors Seg 1, 01 MC]<object:standard:la.1112.2.1.1>

“I had a white companion too, not a bad chap, but rather too fleshy and with the exasperating habit of

fainting on the hot hillsides, miles away from the least bit of shade and water. Annoying, you know, to hold your own coat like a parasol over a man’s head while he is coming-to. I couldn’t help asking him once what he meant by coming there at all. ‘To make money, of course. What do you think?’ he said, scornfully.”

Explain the author’s use of characterization in this excerpt from Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness to support his view of the British Empire.

Question 32 (Essay Worth 20 points)

[Honors Seg 1, 01 MC]<object:standard:la.1112.2.1.8>

“These moribund shapes were free as air–and nearly as

thin. I began to distinguish the gleam of eyes under the trees. Then,

glancing down, I saw a face near my hand. The black bones reclined at

full length with one shoulder against the tree, and slowly the eyelids

rose and the sunken eyes looked up at me, enormous and vacant, a kind of

blind, white flicker in the depths of the orbs, which died out slowly.

The man seemed young–almost a boy–but you know with them it’s hard to

tell. I found nothing else to do but to offer him one of my good Swede’s

ship’s biscuits I had in my pocket. The fingers closed slowly on it and

held–there was no other movement and no other glance.”

Identify the theme of this excerpt from The Heart of Darkness, by Joseph Conrad, and explain the author’s interpretation of the British Empire.

Question 33 (Essay Worth 20 points)

[Honors Seg 1, 06 MC]<object:standard:la.1112.3.2.3>

“Moreover, I respected the fellow. Yes; I respected his collars, his vast cuffs, his brushed hair. His appearance was certainly that of a hairdresser’s dummy; but in the great demoralization of the land he kept up his appearance. That’s backbone. His starched collars and got-up shirt-fronts were achievements of character. He had been out nearly three years; and, later on, I could not help asking him how he managed to sport such linen. He had just the faintest blush, and said modestly, ‘I’ve been teaching one of the native women about the station. It was difficult. She had a distaste for the work.’ This man had verily accomplished something. And he was devoted to his books, which were in apple-pie order.”

Identify and explain Joseph Conrad’s formal or informal writing style in this passage from The Heart of Darkness, citing specific examples from the text.







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