Using writing resources correctly | StudyDaddy.com

As with all written assignments in this course, please be sure that your paper is single-spaced, in 12-point font, and in Times or Times New Roman typeface. In a single line at the top of your assignment, include: Your Name, A#, CCA 3330, Assignment Name, Assignment Date. If you have any questions about how to format your paper, please contact the course manager.

Preparation:

  • Open the Guide to Using Sources, located in the Using Sources Correctly module, on the Home page, and in the Pages tab. You should keep this guide open and refer to it throughout this assignment and all future written assignments. (Right click on the link to open the guide in its own window or tab, so that you can switch back and forth between the guide and the assignment instructions.)
  • Watch & play “The Cite is Right” (optional, but fun):http://library.camden.rutgers.edu/EducationalModule/Plagiarism/citeisright.html  (Links to an external site.)

Part 1: Works Cited

  • Read the Works Cited section of the Guide to Using Sources and refer back to it as needed.
  • Below are three different passages. Create a works cited section using the sources of these three passages.
  • Label this section of your paper Part 1.

Format your works cited citations according to MLA guidelines. Part 1 should only include a works cited section. Please do NOT quote the text of the passages here.Remember that a works cited section should be in alphabetical order. Also remember that in this course I require you to include the full URL in your web citations, in angle brackets <>.

Passage AFrom the book Why a Painting is Like a Pizza by Nancy G. Heller. Publisher: Princeton University Press. City: Princeton. Year: 2002.“The early reviews of Pollock’s dripped and poured paintings were largely negative, though several influential writers recognized a spark of something important in his work. Yet in 1949—two years after he had begun making his signature works—Pollock was featured in a Life magazine article that asked if he was ‘the greatest living painter in the United States?’ This rhetorical—and deliberately inflammatory—question greatly increased the public’s curiosity about the artist, whose celebrity status remains undiminished today.”

Passage BWeb article from the Purdue OWL website (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/06/ (Links to an external site.)):”If there are more than three authors, you may choose to list only the first author followed by the phrase et al. (Latin for “and others”) in place of the subsequent authors’ names, or you may list all the authors in the order in which their names appear on the title page. (Note that there is a period after “al” in “et al.” Also note that there is never a period after the “et” in “et al.”).”

Passage CFrom a New York Times online theatre review (http://theater.nytimes.com/2012/04/16/theater/reviews/peter-and-the-starcatcher-with-christian-borle.html?_r=0 (Links to an external site.)):”I suppose you could say that “Peter” is a coming-of-age tale about how Boy comes into his extraordinariness. But it’s equally about our willingness, with the help of some highly skilled guides, to accept the extraordinary, to will ourselves into believing that what the actors tell us is happening is really happening.”

Part 2: Paraphrasing

  • Read the Paraphrasing section of the Guide to Using Sources and refer back to it as needed.
  • Below is a quotation from page 75 of the book, Why a Painting is Like a Pizza by Nancy G. Heller. Publisher: Princeton University Press. City: Princeton. Year: 2002.
  • Read the section carefully, then paraphrase the passage in your own words. Your paraphrase should be 2-3 sentences long. If you aren’t sure exactly how to paraphrase, review this page from the Purdue OWL: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/619/1/ (Links to an external site.)
  • Include an in-text citation at the end of your paraphrase.
  • Then include a full works cited entry at the end of your paraphrase. 
  • Label this section of your paper Part 2.

“Because he ‘wanted to be inside’ his paintings, from 1947 until his death a decade later Pollock typically avoided both easels and stretcher strips. Instead, he unrolled huge lengths of raw canvas (since canvas is simply a kind of cloth, this was like unrolling a bolt of wool or silk) on the floor of his barn-like studio in East Hampton, New York. Then Pollock literally flung paint (and sometimes also dropped bits of plastic, metal springs, or even cigarette butts) onto the canvas as he danced all around it, using brushes, sticks, pierced metal cans, his fingers, or anything else he wanted to add color to the picture. This was hardly a calm, Renaissance-style way of putting a painting together. It also wasn’t neat; Pollock inevitably got paint all over his clothes, the floor, and everything else in range.

“The early reviews of Pollock’s dripped and poured paintings were largely negative, though several influential writers recognized a spark of something important in his work. Yet in 1949—two years after he had begun making his signature works—Pollock was featured in a Life magazine article that asked if he was ‘the greatest living painter in the United States?’ This rhetorical—and deliberately inflammatory—question greatly increased the public’s curiosity about the artist, whose celebrity status remains undiminished today.”

Part 3: Quoting

  • Read the Quoting section of the Guide to Using Sources and refer back to it as needed.
  • This section involves using the library resources.   On the left side of the Canvas page, under Home, Syllabus, Quizzes, etc., is a tab called Research Help.  That is where the USU library has placed their information for this assignment.
  • Using the information provided in the Research Help, search in Opera: The Great Composers and Their Masterworks for information about the composer Richard Wagner. Read the brief biographical entry you find there.
  • Select a 1-2 sentence quotation from the biography.
  • Copy and paste the paragraph below into your paper. Delete the phrases in all caps and insert the information requested. In place of “insert quote here,” insert your own 1-2 sentence quotation about the composer.
  • You will be graded on whether or not you have formatted your quotation correctly and whether or not the quotation you have selected makes sense in the context of the paragraph. If you need to add a small amount of text to the stock paragraph below in order for your quotation to make sense, that is acceptable. See the rubric below for full grading guidelines.
  • Note that both the titles of encyclopedias and of major musical works should be in italics.

I read a brief biography of COMPOSER’S NAME in NAME OF ENCYCLOPEDIA, and I learned a lot about this composer’s life. While reading about COMPOSER’S NAME, I learned that one of his most famous works was NAME OF WORK. The most interesting thing I learned about this composer was INSERT QUOTE HERE. This composer’s music continues to enchant listeners long after his death.

  • Include an in-text citation at the end of your quotation.
  • Then include a full works cited entry at the end of the paragraph. 
  • Label this section of your paper Part 3.

Part 4: More citing!

  • Read the Works Cited section of the Guide to Using Sources and refer back to it as needed.
  • Go to The New York Times website, and type “theater review” in the search box at the top left of the page. Choose a review from the results of your search.
  • Cite this review correctly, according to the template found at the bottom of the Guide to Using Sources for citing reviews accessed online.
  • Label this section of your paper Part 4.

When you submit this assignment, please only include a comment if you have a question or another pertinent message to send to the instructional team. Do not include redundant information in the comments box, such as your name, A#, or file name. Each comment sends an email to the instructional team; entering redundant information clogs the system and delays our ability to respond to students who actually need help.

# The information for the page “Guide to Using Sources” is below :

Avoiding Plagiarism Overview

Learning how to avoid plagiarism and to cite sources properly is an essential part of your education. Because plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty and carries with it heavy penalties (in both this course and the broader academic world), I want you to learn this material thoroughly. I encourage you to revisit this page frequently throughout the course, until you feel completely comfortable with the rules of how to give credit to your sources.

You will see point values tied to your use of citations in each of your writing assignments for this course. A rubric is included with each of the assignments, so you can see how many points are associated with correct citation. More significant problems with plagiarism and failure to cite are addressed individually.

In this course, my goal is that you will learn how to:

  • Paraphrase information you have gathered from a source, by writing the information in your own words.
  • Place quotation marks around directly quoted text.
  • Give credit to sources for both paraphrased and quoted material, by including an in-text citation.
  • Include the correct information in in-text citations, including author’s name and page number. (It is okay to include only the author’s name when citing web sources.)
  • Always include a work’s cited section at the end of a paper, which includes all sources cited in the text of the paper.
  • Format works cited sections correctly, according to standard MLA guidelines. (For this course, always include the full URL in web citations.)

Most students do not want to cheat, nor do they actively plan to cheat. In my experience, most of the plagiarism in this class comes from students not paraphrasing properly. I’ve seen a few instances of intentional plagiarism, which I think mostly comes from panic. This guide is about avoiding plagiarism altogether.

First, read a few pages on plagiarism. These pages are located at the Purdue OWL (Online Writing Lab). This a very good site for all things about writing.

Overview and Contradictions (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/01/ (Links to an external site.))

Is It Plagiarism Yet? (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/02/ (Links to an external site.))

Safe Practices (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/589/03/ (Links to an external site.))

This page gives further information about plagiarism:

Plagiarism.org (http://www.plagiarism.org/ (Links to an external site.))

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Citing Properly

The bottom line of writing is that if you didn’t think of it yourself, you need to cite it. We will now cover ways of incorporating a source’s information into your writing and then discuss how to give credit where credit is due.

Paraphrasing

Paraphrasing means putting information into your own words without using quotation marks. Note that paraphrasing means you are not using the source’s words at all.

This website gives very clear examples of how to do this correctly:

Paraphrase: Write it in Your Own Words (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/619/1/ (Links to an external site.))

Quoting

If you use any words, phrases, or sentences directly from a source, you must put those words or phrases into quotation marks. Read more and find examples here:

How to Use Quotation Marks (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/577/01/ (Links to an external site.))

Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/01/ (Links to an external site.))

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In-text Citations

The way I like to think of it, the purpose of an in-text citation is two-fold: 1) to alert your reader that you are paraphrasing or quoting someone else’s words and giving credit to your sources, and 2) to guide your reader to the exact place where they can find that quote in your source. That way, if they wanted, your reader could go to the works cited page at the end of your paper, find the full information about the source, and find the exact page where you found the quote or material you’ve paraphrased.

Whenever you paraphrase or quote directly from a source, you need to include an in-text citation. In general, an in-text citation should include the author’s name and the page number where you found the material.

This page describes exactly how to format an in-text citation and how to adjust your citations, depending upon which type of source you’re citing:

MLA In-text Citations: The Basics (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/2/ (Links to an external site.))

This page is also helpful:

Citing Sources (http://libguides.usu.edu/content.php?pid=41137&sid=302758 (Links to an external site.))

Works Cited

In-text citations are designed to “link” to a works cited page—they guide your reader to the full source information listed at the end of the paper. I should be able to pick up your paper, use the in-text citations to see which parts of your paper came from other sources, and then follow those in-text bits to the works cited page and there find exactly what the book you’ve referenced was called, who wrote it, what year it was published, and whatever other information I would need to get my hands on a copy of it. I could then find a copy of the book myself in a library or online. Once I had the book in hand, I could then turn to the page you’ve noted in your in-text citation, knowing I would find the material you used in your paper.

There are very different ways of citing sources: MLA, APA, and Chicago are the three main methods. Because this is an arts course, we use MLA formatting throughout the class. Given that, the need to distinguish between your own and others’ ideas is standard across disciplines and classes.

This page shows you what a works cited page should look like and gives you examples for each type of source:

MLA Works Cited Page: Basic Format (http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/05/ (Links to an external site.))

And here are specific guidelines for different types of sources:

Books Author Last, First. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year the book was published.More details: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/06/ (Links to an external site.)

WebsitesAuthor Last, First. “Article Name.” Title of Website. Date of publication. Web. Date of access. <URL>More details: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/08/ (Links to an external site.)

FilmsDirector Last, First, dir. Title of Film. Name of Production Studio, Year of production. Film. More details: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/09/ (Links to an external site.)

Articles Author Last, First. “Article Name.” Title of Publication/Magazine/Journal. Year. Medium.More details: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/07/ (Links to an external site.)

Reviews accessed online Author Last, First. “Article Name.” Rev. of Performance Title, dir. Director Name. Newspaper Title. Date of Publication. Web. Date of Access. <URL>

Reviews accessed in printAuthor Last, First. “Article Name.” Rev. of Performance Title, dir. Director Name. Newspaper Title. Date of Publication. Day Month Year: Page.More details: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/07/ (Links to an external site.)

See here for help citing a source with multiple authors: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/06/ (Links to an external site.)

This page is also helpful:

Citing Sources (http://libguides.usu.edu/content.php?pid=41137&sid=302758 (Links to an external site.))







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